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Overleden veteranen 
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Jelle Y.

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Bericht Re: Overleden veteranen
Overleden op 19 januari 2012 Navy Cross-ontvanger Warren Skon

Zijn vrouw, ook 92 jaar oud, overleed eveneens aan longontsteking 3 dagen later...

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ma feb 27, 2012 7:36 pm
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Bericht Re: Overleden veteranen
muncio schreef:
Godspeed respect voor Lynn D. 'Buck' Compton.
The same for Clarence Dart.
God bless them all.


RIP Mr Compton, we will miss you.

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do maart 01, 2012 2:13 pm
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Bericht Re: Overleden veteranen
Richmond Times-Dispatch meldt het overlijden van Col. Thomas Barfoot, ontvanger van de Medal of Honor, op 92-jarige leeftijd.

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za maart 03, 2012 3:37 pm
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Bericht Re: Overleden veteranen
Overleden:Robert B. Sherman *December 19, 1925 – + March 5, 2012

"World War II

In 1943, Sherman obtained permission from his parents to join the army a year early, at age 17. In early April 1945, he led half a squad of men into Dachau concentration camp, the first Allied troops to enter the camp after it had been evacuated by the fleeing German military only hours earlier. On April 12, 1945, the day President Franklin D. Roosevelt died, Sherman was shot in the knee, forcing him to walk with a cane for the rest of his life.

For his service to his country, he received two Battle Stars, a Combat Infantryman Badge, an American Campaign Medal, a World War II Victory Medal, a European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal and a Good Conduct Medal. In addition, Sherman was also awarded several Army Weapons Qualifications badges including a "Sharpshooter badge" with bars for both rifle and submachine gun; a "Marksman Badge" for carbine and an "Expert Badge" for rifle and grenade."

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wo maart 07, 2012 2:49 am
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Harro

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Bericht Re: Overleden veteranen
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituar ... Ekins.html
Citaat:
Joe Ekins, who has died aged 88, ambushed and knocked out four German tanks, including three Tigers, in a day and was said to have fired the shot that killed a German panzer ace.

In August 1944, during the breakout from the Caen salient, Ekins was serving with the 1st Northamptonshire Yeomanry (1 NY). He was the gunner of a Firefly tank, a Sherman equipped with a British 17-pounder.

These were more manoeuvrable than the German Tigers but less well protected. The latter, with their heavy armour and 88mm guns, were the most feared weapons in Normandy and, a few weeks earlier, a lone Tiger was reported to have destroyed 14 Allied tanks in as many minutes.

After a night move, a troop of 1 NY’s tanks was leaguered in an orchard near St Aignan-de-Cramesnil, a few miles inside German-held territory. The following morning, the Germans counter-attacked. For Ekins, it was his first action.

He saw three Tiger tanks advancing across open farmland near the road from Caen to Falaise. He opened fire and got off two shots at a range of about 800 yards and knocked out one of them. As the other two Tigers rapidly traversed their guns, his Firefly reversed into cover but an answering shot smashed the heavy steel turret lid, injuring the tank commander, who staggered out.

The troop leader ran to the tank and guided the driver to a new firing position under some apple trees. At the next shot from Ekins, the turret of the second Tiger exploded. The remaining Tiger might have had a damaged periscope, for it was circling as it tried to escape.

Ekins loosed two more shots and this tank, too, started to burn. In 12 minutes, Ekins had destroyed three Tigers. Later, he destroyed another tank, reported to be a Panzer IV, at a distance of about 1,200 yards. His own tank was then hit. There was a loud bang, a cloud of sparks, the crew scrambled out and, in Ekins’s words, “we ran like hell.”

It was later claimed that with his third tank “kill” Ekins had brought about the death of the German tank ace Michael Wittmann, a veteran of the Russian front credited with the destruction of 138 tanks and 132 anti-tank guns. Several other units were the subject of similar claims. Among them was the Sherbrooke Fusiliers Regiment, which had a squadron in the area.

Joseph William Ekins was born at Riseley, Bedfordshire, on July 15 1923 and educated at Riseley School. He enlisted in 1 NY in 1940 and took part in the D-Day landings in Normandy.

Ekins’s “tally” of four “kills” was, by any standard, a remarkable feat of gunnery, but he received no recognition for it. Indeed, he never even fired another round because he was then given the job of wireless operator.

The claim that he fired the shot that killed Wittmann has been reinforced by recent research, but he sought no glory for himself as a result. Nor did he express any regrets about killing Wittmann, if indeed he had done so, noting that the German tank ace “was in someone else’s country without being asked” and had got what he deserved.

In 1945 Ekins was invalided out of the Army with diphtheria and became a shoe worker. He rose to be a manager of several factories and was a designer and lecturer. He was also a partner in a business promoting the use of computers. Technology was very important to him and he continued to make full use of it right up to the time of his death.

In 1988 he retired and settled in at Rushden, Northamptonshire. He was a holder of the Black Belt at judo and was a regional chairman of the British Judo Association. He was awarded the Queen’s Jubilee Medal for services to sport.

Joe Ekins married, in 1946, Stella (Gwen) Swain. She predeceased him, as did a daughter, and he is survived by their son.

Joe Ekins, born July 15 1923, died February 1 2012

Afbeelding


do maart 08, 2012 11:28 am
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Jean

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Bericht Re: Overleden veteranen
Major Joe Schofield, who has died aged 90, wore the SAS Badge and Wings for a continuous period of close to 40 years; he also had the distinction of being the only soldier to serve with five SAS regiments.

Major Joe Schofield 11:30AM GMT 12 Feb 2012

Schofield joined the 1st SAS in North Africa in 1941 as it was evolving from L Detachment, its earliest incarnation under its founder David Stirling. He was fortunate to survive his parachute training. The aircraft to be used were not equipped with static fixed lines, and Schofield said later that on his first jump the parachutes of the three men ahead of him “roman-candled” and they fell to their deaths: “I was Number Four in the stick.” The air dispatcher just managed to grab him before he jumped.
Schofield took part with the regiment in several raids on airfields and in the ambushing of convoys on the coastal road. After it was reorganised in 1943 as the Special Raiding Squadron (SRS) under Paddy Mayne, he saw action in the invasion of Sicily. Schofield was part of the force that scaled the cliffs at Cape Murro di Porco and knocked out a fortified farmhouse at the top. On the Italian mainland, he fought alongside the Commandos in the capture and then dogged defence of Termoli.
In August 1944, in an operation code-named “HAGGARD”, Schofield was dropped into France with a party from “B” Squadron 1st SAS and elements of the French and Belgian SAS. There they linked up with the Maquis around the Falaise pocket, harassing German units and signalling their positions to the RAF. The following winter he was involved in long-range reconnaissance patrols during the Battle of the Ardennes.
In April 1945, at Lorup, near Cloppenburg in Germany, Schofield was in the leading jeep scouting ahead of a column when he came under heavy machine-gun and rifle fire from two houses and a wood beside a country road. His commander was killed, and Schofield was momentarily pinned by shrapnel through one leg to the bodywork of the vehicle. Dragging himself on to the bonnet to return fire, he was then hit in the other leg by a sniper. Bleeding profusely from his wounds, he and his driver were taking cover in a ditch when they were narrowly missed by two rockets from a panzerfaust.
Mayne, alerted by radio, went forward alone and cleared the houses with a Bren, shooting from the shoulder. With a volunteer manning the rear guns, he then drove his jeep up the road under fire, engaged the enemy troops in the wood, turned around, drove back down and then — while still under attack — returned a third time to rescue the wounded Schofield. He was subsequently recommended for the Victoria Cross but received instead his fourth DSO.
Albert Schofield was born at Stalybridge, Cheshire, on June 23 1921. His father worked for the railways delivering parcels in horse-drawn vans. Educated at the local school, he left at 14 and was taken on by an engineering company. The owner had promised him work in the drawing office but then gave the job to his son. Schofield, offered alternative employment as a steel forger, walked out.
He enlisted in the Army Supplementary Reserve and, after a spell with the Cheshire Regiment, in 1938 transferred to the Life Guards. His exemplary record with the Cheshires earned him promotion on transfer, but he found himself the smallest in the troop — his nickname “Joe” originated from a cartoon called “Little Joe” that was popular at the time.
He was regularly given sentry duty around Whitehall, where tourists used to drop coins into his highly polished boots, providing useful beer money.
At the outbreak of war, he was too young to go to France with the BEF and was put in charge of the horse lines in Windsor Great Park. He subsequently volunteered to join No 8 Commando, and after rigorous training in Scotland he formed part of a detachment that landed at Tobruk in 1941. On the night of July 17 he took part in an attack on a feature known as the Twin Pimples, a defensive strongpoint held by the Italians which dominated the Allied lines.
The defenders spotted the Commandos, but they were firing on fixed lines and the bullets passed over the heads of the attacking force as they crept towards their objective. Schofield said afterwards that they had gone in with fixed bayonets and that the fight was “short and bloody”. Just when they thought that they had cleared the trenches, Schofield found the door of a concealed hatch. The Italians had constructed shelters underneath where more troops were hiding.
As he lifted up the door, a bayonet was thrust upwards which wounded him in the hand. Someone hurled a grenade into the shelter and he had to jump clear to avoid being killed in the explosion. After the order was given to withdraw, they set off across the desert.
Discovering that a great friend of his, Jackie Maynard, was missing, Schofield turned back and found Maynard, who had an abdominal wound. Schofield carried him to base under continual fire, but Maynard died. Schofield always regretted that he had not been able to stay with him.
Schofield was then selected for an undercover mission in Turkey. The country was neutral, but there were fears that Axis forces might try to take over. Ostensibly supervising a team of engineers, his actual job was to lay explosive charges under strategically important bridges in Cappadocia. To his surprise, he discovered that charges had been laid by the Germans in the First World War and were already in place. His task became the simpler one of checking the explosives and adding to them or replacing them where necessary.
After being wounded in Germany, Schofield spent 10 months in plaster. Following a spell as parachute instructor at the Airborne forces depot, in 1947 he was posted to 21 SAS as a permanent staff instructor. He served with “D” Squadron 22 SAS in Malaya (1953-55), returning there as RSM and serving from 1957 to 1959. Between those two postings, he was RSM of 21 SAS. He returned to England as RSM of 23 SAS.
In 1965 Schofield was commissioned into 22 SAS as a captain, based at Hereford, and eventually became quartermaster. His tour of duty ended in 1971, but he extended his service until 1979 as a Retired Officer.
He was appointed MBE in 1969.
Schofield was an active member of the SAS Association and was tireless in organising visits to France to lay wreaths on the graves of those members of the SAS who had been killed (and, in some instances, executed) there. In retirement he enjoyed gardening, fishing and family life.
Joe Schofield married, in 1947, Sheelagh Ledwith, who survives him with their two sons and two daughters.

Major Joe Schofield, born June 23 1921, died February 8 2012
Afbeelding

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do maart 08, 2012 2:25 pm
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muncio

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Bericht Re: Overleden veteranen
Godspeed, respect!


ma maart 19, 2012 1:02 pm
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Egbert

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Bericht Re: Overleden veteranen
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/20/us/ja ... .html?_r=1

James Morehead, World War II Flying Ace, Dies at 95

As a boy in Dust Bowl Oklahoma, James B. Morehead stalked and hunted to eat. As a young Army flier in the Pacific, he stalked and hunted to live.

His boyhood skills served him acutely well on April 25, 1942, over Darwin, Australia. Leading a squadron of eight P-40 Warhawks — unwieldy, frustratingly slow fighter planes that were vastly outpaced by Japanese aircraft — Lieutenant Morehead faced down, outthought and outmaneuvered a winged armada of about 30 Japanese bombers, guarded by a fleet of Japanese fighter planes.

He shot down three Japanese planes that day; his men shot down eight more, and the entire squadron returned to its base unscathed. Their victory, for which Lieutenant Morehead was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, was among the first to chip away at Japan’s seeming invincibility in the Pacific.

A career Air Force officer who retired as a colonel, he was among the most highly decorated flying aces of World War II, engaging in 20 dogfights and downing eight enemy planes in the Pacific and Europe. In all, he earned two Distinguished Service Crosses (an Army decoration second only to the Medal of Honor), the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Silver Star and a number of other medals. Colonel Morehead, who in later years was a commercial real estate developer and big-game hunter, died on March 11, at 95, in Petaluma, Calif., his family said.

James Bruce Morehead was born on Aug. 16, 1916, in Paoli, Okla., and raised in Washington, Okla. His father, Clem, was a small farmer who ran the town general store; his mother, Ophelia, was a schoolteacher. As a boy during the Depression, James became a crack shot with a rifle, which helped put food on the table.

As a young man, he studied entomology at the University of Oklahoma before moving to California to try to earn a living. There he joined the Army Air Corps, as it was then known, in 1940. His exploits in the cockpit — which included flying the nearly 80 miles from his base near Novato, Calif., to Sacramento upside down simply because he could —earned him the nickname Wildman.

When Pearl Harbor was attacked, Lieutenant Morehead was in the hospital, recovering from injuries sustained in a midair training collision. Had he been fit, he would have been dispatched with his unit to the Philippines; many of his friends in the unit were captured there by the Japanese and died on the Bataan Death March.

Lieutenant Morehead was eventually sent to Australia, where he found himself with just two weeks to prepare untried young fliers to face the Japanese onslaught.

“It’s like sending the Los Angeles Lakers basketball team to oppose the Petaluma High School basketball team,” he told The Press Democrat of Santa Rosa, Calif., last year.

In shooting down three planes that April day in 1942, Lieutenant Morehead engaged the enemy in a calculated, deadly dance much as he had done with his boyhood quarry, reckoning when to lead, when to follow and precisely when to strike.

“Aerial gunnery is a matter of interception,” he said in a talk in 2002. “You cannot look at the target, shoot at the target and ever hit the target.” He added: “You’re going to hit eight feet behind that pheasant if you point right at him.”

Elsewhere in the Pacific, Lieutenant Morehead shot down four enemy planes. On D-Day, June, 6, 1944 — he was by then a major — he shot down his eighth and last plane of the war, a German Messerschmitt, over Romania.

During the Korean War, he served in Taiwan, training pilots in Chiang Kai-shek’s Nationalist forces. He later served at the Pentagon, retiring in 1967.

Colonel Morehead’s first marriage, to Aldine Seeger, ended in divorce. His second wife, the former Betty Bob Angerman, whom he married in 1960, died last year. He is survived by two daughters from his second marriage, Myrna Moritz and Melanie Morehead, and two grandchildren. A son, Jimmy, from his first marriage, died in the 1960s.

Colonel Morehead was the author of a memoir, “In My Sights,” published in 1997.

To the end of his life, Colonel Morehead cheerfully courted risk. In a telephone interview, his daughter Myrna described unusually exhilarating childhood car trips.

“He’d always ask me and my friends, ‘What thrill do you want — 1, 2 or 3?’ ” she recalled. “And that would be the level of how scary you wanted it to be.”

Level 1, the scariest, entailed barreling at about 70 miles per hour down the narrow, winding rural road that led to the family home near Petaluma.

“I usually wanted 1,” she said.

Zij memoires zijn te verkrijgen via Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/In-My-Sights-Memo ... 914&sr=8-1

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ma maart 19, 2012 5:12 pm
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Bericht Re: Overleden veteranen
Sylvain Pelicaen is op 87-jarige leeftijd overleden.
In 1944 sloot hij zich aan bij het Britse leger.
Hij wordt vandaag, 31 maart, om 10u begraven in de Sint-Martinuskerk van Asse.

Afbeelding

Voor het artikel: Het Nieuwsblad

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Leopold III, 25 mei 1940


za maart 31, 2012 8:38 am
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Pieter F

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Bericht Re: Overleden veteranen
Frank Bagshaw OBE (105) en Albert Smith DFC (94), beide RAF-vliegers, zijn overleden. De nieuwsberichten hierover zijn geplaatst in de Eglish Section van het forum.

Albert Smith op WW2Awards

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wo apr 25, 2012 12:21 pm
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Harro

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Bericht Re: Overleden veteranen
Rolf Diercks (Preetz, 17 december 1915) is op 16 februari 2012 overleden. Hij was studiegenoot van Knittel op de Junkerschule in Bad Tölz, won als SS-Sturmbannführer in de divisie "Das Reich" het Deutsche Kreuz in Gold en had na de oorlog een zeer kritische kijk op zijn eigen verleden en op de Waffen-SS als geheel. In het verleden heb ik al enkele keren uit brieven van hem geciteerd.
Citaat:
Ihre Auffassung, ich könnte sehr frühzeitig, in der Schulzeit von der NS-Ideologie "indoktriniert" worden sein, ist durchaus richtig. Ob das jedoch die Wurzel meines selbstkritischen Umgangs mit der SS-Vergangenheit ist, weiß ich nicht so genau. Es könnte aber zweifellos sein, dass ich leichter zu meinem "Damaskus-Erlebnis" zur Einsicht in der Irrweg des gesamten Systems (einschl. der Waffen-SS) gekommen bin als die jüngere Generation, die möglicherweise erst seit Beginn der Kriegszeit die (übrigens erst dann gigantisch expandierende) Waffen-SS kennengelernt hat und daher – ohne weltanschaulich überhaupt noch geschult worden zu sein – nur die oft schwerem Kampfeinsätze, vorwiegend gegen den ja auch von den damaligen West-Alliierten gefürchteten (Welt-) Bolschewismus verinnerlicht hat. Doch eine Entschuldigung kann das für die jüngere Generation m.E. nicht sein, wenn sie sich nicht darum bemüht hat, ihr unmittelbar nach dem Kriege noch verständliches Vorurteil zu korrigieren, also einzusehen, daß sie mit den Sigrunen zu HIMMLERS "Ordengemeinschaft" gehört hatten, die maßgeblich Träger und Motor des biologischen Rassenwahns und der imperialistischen "Germano-manie" im Dritten Reich gewesen ist! […] Selbst Heute fehlt in manchen Kreisen von uns noch der rechte Umgang mit unserer Vergangenheit. Wir waren leider auch noch etwas anderes als „Soldaten wie anderen auch“(HAUSSER)


do apr 26, 2012 12:37 pm
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Pieter F

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Bericht Re: Overleden veteranen
George Vujnovich, an O.S.S. agent in World War II who oversaw the rescue of more than 500 downed Allied airmen from German-occupied Yugoslavia, his parents’ homeland, died Tuesday in Queens. He was 96.

Complete nieuwsbericht in de NY Times

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di mei 01, 2012 10:04 am
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Pieter F

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Bericht Re: Overleden veteranen
Geen echte veteraan, maar ik wilde het nieuwsbericht toch hier posten:

The Telegraph schreef:
Premysl Dobias, who has died aged 98, was the oldest of the survivors of Nazi persecution to relate their experiences in the Imperial War Museum’s Holocaust Exhibition.

Volledige artikel

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za mei 05, 2012 8:33 am
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Bericht Re: Overleden veteranen
Gunnar Sønsteby, 11 January 1918 – 10 May 2012 is overleden.
Hij was de hoogst gedecoreerde Noor en werkte voor SOE.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gunnar_S%C3%B8nsteby

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do mei 10, 2012 4:06 pm
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Pieter F

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Bericht Re: Overleden veteranen
jw1985 schreef:
Gunnar Sønsteby, 11 January 1918 – 10 May 2012 is overleden.
Hij was de hoogst gedecoreerde Noor en werkte voor SOE.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gunnar_S%C3%B8nsteby

Telegraph - Gunnar Sønsteby

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vr mei 11, 2012 4:41 pm
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